Variotram FAQ

Frequently asked questions

The Variotram prompts a lot of questions, particularly the technological leap between the Sydney R1 class tram and the Variotram, and the fact our museum tramway is built to ‘traditional’ tramway standards.

Can 2107 operate on 600V?

The tram can operate (at reduced power) down to 500V. No modification was needed, that is the ‘way it came’. The main issue is the regenerative braking which could raise the overhead voltage to approximately 730 volts which is considered a bit high for our heritage fleet that might be out at the same time. Bombardier has supplied new software to adjust this voltage.

The Mannheim (Germany) Variotrams could change from -750V supply to +600V supply and back without stopping. (Mannheim was -750V and Heidelberg was +600V, the trams through run between the two cities). This adaptive ability is a key part of the ‘Drive Control Unit’ software.

Can your substation power such a large tram?

The peak power draw for 2107 (including airconditioning) is less than that for PCC 1014. However, tests at the end of the National Park line will be required to confirm calculations on voltage drop. 1014 will still move when the voltage drops below 500V. 2107 will not.

The Variotrams had special wheels. How does this work on your track?

The ‘hybrid’ profile wheels are a combination of European/Melbourne street running flanges and a wheel back ‘step’ to allow running through railway style point check rails. Melbourne flanges are slightly too large for Sydney style track, but not majorly oversize. The step clears most of the Sydney style raised check rails. That said to ensure smooth trouble free operation the wheels need reprofiling before 2107 can be regularly used.

Are you going to fit trolley poles to 2107?

No. Such a modification would be out of character for the vehicle.

Are you going to modify the museum overhead for pantograph operation?

Yes. Depending on other work the contractors have on, this will happen first quarter 2019. Donations to offset the costs are welcome.

Who owns 2107?

2107 is part of the State movable heritage collection and as such is owned by Railcorp and ‘managed’ by Transport Heritage NSW. The Sydney Tram Museum are the ‘custodians’ of the asset on their behalf.